Noise Pollution Made Visible With NoiseGate iOS App

Something to try: NoiseGate is the only iOS application that focuses exclusively on the dangerous impact of noise pollution on health and mental wellbeing. The app was developed by a group of master class students during one of the many challenges at the Apple Developer Academy in Napoli, Italy, and is available for free on the Apple iTunes App Store as the first app published in the 2017/2018 academy alumni. 

noisegate.co


Why Noise Pollution?

To date, noise pollution is one of the most dangerous forms of pollution because it is silent. Most sounds around us are random or unpleasant. That’s why we call it noise and we tend to ignore them. As a recent review published in the European Heart Journal pointed out, the role of noise as an environmental pollutant and its impact on health are increasingly recognized.

Beyond its effects on the auditory system, noise causes discomfort, disturbs sleep and compromises cognitive performance. Furthermore, evidence from epidemiological studies show that environmental noise is associated with an increased incidence of arterial hypertension, myocardial infarction and stroke.

The victims of this form of pollution is practically anyone in any urban environment in the world. The NoiseGate app allows users to be more aware of their noise exposure and to contribute to a better understanding of noise pollution as a common problem.

Users can measure and calculate the actual noise level in their current position and obtain further analysis to make better decisions on how to avoid high noise levels over time. Simultaneously, all users contribute as “citizen scientists” to the creation of a global map of noise level distribution.

noisegate.co - be aware and escape the noise


Using NoiseGate

With an intuitive design and a user friendly interface, it is very easy to analyze the noise level in real time or dig deeper into the knowledge of the problem thanks to the thermal noise maps that allows to view the distribution of noise all over the world. The strong focus on a simple but meaningful user experience, combined with a colorblind-proof design pushes the app far beyond the many applications in the utility and health categories.

In addition, NoiseGate is the “first mover” app in an unexplored segment of the iOS ecosystem that provides a toolset for solving an individual issue and translating it into an awareness community.

 


Created With Love At The Apple Developer Academy 

NoiseGate was created by a group of fellow master class students (Lucas Assis Rodrigues, Rany Azevedo, Maddalena Granata, Giovanni Monaco, Giselle Katics) and myself during one of the various challenges during the master class at Apple Developer Academy 2017/2018 in Napoli, Italy. For more information about the app itself, the data it gathers or some of the media coverage visit noisegate.co.

noisegate.co - team

Archiving my last tumblr blog – Urban Storytelling

Urban Storytelling Animation

Back in 2015,  Jessica Broscheit, Hannes Sieg and myself created a tumblr blog to collect thoughts on urban storytelling, data driven narratives and visualisation of urban data, digital and tangible designs as well as art installations in urban spaces. All this related to research into data driven storytelling, open government data, knowledge discovery in databases (KDD), rapid prototyping and design thinking.

Some of the work led to projects such as How Will We Breath Tomorrow, a workshop led by Jessica Broscheit during A/D/A Hamburg 2016, as well as me participating as a mentor in Jeremy Bailey’s The Lean Artist Accelerator, a seed accelerator program for artists.

Since we all moved on, completed our research and are now involved in subsequent or different projects, no more content has been added to urban-storytelling.com for quite some time. In addition to the latest developments around tumblr and yahoo it makes no sense for me to keep the content up, so I cancelled the domain and closed the urban storytelling blog on tumblr for good.

Some of the content can be found on this website, but most posts were just links to interesting stuff related to urban storytelling, urban data, visualisations, map technology and data journalism. The links might be useful in the future and maybe I will put a post containing a list of them at some point.

How Will We Breathe Tomorrow? – Working with Open Government Data

As mentioned before, Jessica Broscheit is conducting a workshop about air quality and urban data at the Creative Space for Technical Innovations at Hamburg’s University of Applied Sciences. It’s called “How Will We Breathe Tomorrow” and is part of the A/D/A Hamburg 2016, a conference about future utopias for today’s urban citizen. During the workshop people can learn about government efforts to collect and share air quality data in open government data platforms and develop their own air quality monitoring device to experiment with visual, haptic and acoustic ways to explore data.


AIR MASK

Last year I worked with Jessica Broscheit und Hannes Sieg on another project within the “Next Media” master program at the University of Applied Sciences Hamburg (HAW Hamburg), called “Air Mask”. It involved research into air quality data and open government data platforms and lead to the development of a design fiction prototype of an air mask used for monitoring environmental data.

The collected data can be compared globally through a developed standardisation process and local air quality data was visualised on the mask itself in an easy to understand 3-colored alarm system. Just recently, Jessica created a website to document these projects.

Air Mask from Jessica Broscheit on Vimeo.

 

The Art Of Telling No Story – Data-Driven Journalism

311 calls New York
There were 34,522 complaints called in to 311 between September 8 and September 15, 2010. Here are the most common, plotted by time of day. Illustration: Pitch Interactive

Recently I wrote about data-driven journalism and whether it is worth the effort in regards to their monetisation potential for publishing companies. Although there are definitely great and interesting stories to be told with large data sets, it seems unlikely that the immense costs involved in the process of creating these stories can be justified within the current framework of digital business models within the publishing industry.

Still many data-driven stories and corresponding data visualisations seem interesting (e.g. in form of infographics) or even insanely beautiful (e.g. in form of maps or graphs). There is one problem with some kind of data visualisations in terms of storytelling though: they tell no story.

Consider the prominent visualisations of the 311 calls in the city of New York for instance. Although immensely beautiful and acknowledged by design experts around the globe, it’s hard to find any substantial story within the data or its visualisations. As shown above a plot of 311 calls by time of day with different colors for different types of complaints surely leads to a beautiful image, but there is no real story behind it.

The facts that there are more calls during the day, complaints about street condition seem to drop during the night and noise complaints are on the rise during the evening are hardly surprising. Even if these calls are plotted on a map, an attempt also explored with the 311 data, things do not get more interesting.

Still, the visualisations of the 311 calls not only look awesome, they received high praise and are on display at the Museum of Modern Art in NYC. I am not disputing the aesthetic qualities of the visualisations, but in terms of data-driven journalism or data-driven storytelling, there is not much to be found here.


 DISCLAIMER: This post has been written for the seminar “Online and Mobile Media” during an international research exchange at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) in Sydney, Australia, within the “Next Media” master program at the University of Applied Sciences Hamburg (HAW Hamburg) in 2016. For more information or any questions please contact me at mail@moritzrecke.com.

Google trends confirmes stereotypes

vox:

Portland likes coffee, and other accurate food stereotypes now confirmed by Google.

Congratulations, Washington, DC, you’re the most interested in “restaurants:”

google-trends-restaurant

Coffee, unsurprisingly, reigns supreme in Portland, OR:

google-trends-coffee

Wine wins the day in San Francisco:

google-trends-wine

See what else the folks at Google Trends found using search data to determine which large cities and towns care the most about different aspects of the food world.

rAndom International – Rain Room at the Barbican, 2012


The artists of rAndom International created a pretty impressive “rain room” at London’s Barbican arts center in 2012, incorporating 3d tracking cameras and a water management system to keep any visitor dry while walking through the rain.

“Rain Room is a hundred square metre field of falling water through which it is possible to walk, trusting that a path can be navigated, without being drenched in the process.

As you progress through the space the sound of water and a suggestion of moisture fill the air, before you are confronted by this carefully choreographed downpour that responds to your movements and presence.”

Source: Rain Room, 2012 – rAndom International

Urban Storytelling – stories for us by us

Urban Storytelling - stories for us by us

urban-storytelling:

Urban Storytelling – stories for us by us

I am working on topics surrounding urban storytelling in a research group. Any insights and actual research cases will be posted on urban-storytelling.com in the future.

Where have you cried in San Francisco?

Where have you cried in San Francisco? - 1

Where have you cried in San Francisco? - 2

Where have you cried in San Francisco? - 3

Where have you cried in San Francisco? - 4

hocio:

San-FranciscoWhen you tell your story to others you provide also the wisdom of your life to our human community. This digital storytelling collection by IDEO team member Ann-Marie Alcantaratakes place in San Francisco/ Bay Area. “Where have you cried in San Francisco?”.

Actually, real deep.

PS: The last story will kill you.

(1m notes = megadeath)