Archiving my last tumblr blog – Urban Storytelling

Urban Storytelling Animation

Back in 2015,  Jessica Broscheit, Hannes Sieg and myself created a tumblr blog to collect thoughts on urban storytelling, data driven narratives and visualisation of urban data, digital and tangible designs as well as art installations in urban spaces. All this related to research into data driven storytelling, open government data, knowledge discovery in databases (KDD), rapid prototyping and design thinking.

Some of the work led to projects such as How Will We Breath Tomorrow, a workshop led by Jessica Broscheit during A/D/A Hamburg 2016, as well as me participating as a mentor in Jeremy Bailey’s The Lean Artist Accelerator, a seed accelerator program for artists.

Since we all moved on, completed our research and are now involved in subsequent or different projects, no more content has been added to urban-storytelling.com for quite some time. In addition to the latest developments around tumblr and yahoo it makes no sense for me to keep the content up, so I cancelled the domain and closed the urban storytelling blog on tumblr for good.

Some of the content can be found on this website, but most posts were just links to interesting stuff related to urban storytelling, urban data, visualisations, map technology and data journalism. The links might be useful in the future and maybe I will put a post containing a list of them at some point.

Mentor at The Artist Entrepreneur – PRAKSIS summer 2017 residency program

In May 2017 I will join “The Artist Entrepreneur” residency program in Oslo as a mentor and once again work with famous new media artist Jeremy Bailey. We collaborated before, when I joined him in Hamburg as a mentor during the Lean Artist accelerator program in 2016. The PRAKSIS residency will take place from 21 May to 21 June 2017.

Artist Entrepreneurs - Save The World
Artist Entrepreneurs – Save The World

“PRAKSIS, Unge Kunstneres Samfund (UKS) and The Moving Museum are delighted to work with artist Jeremy Bailey(CA) to develop PRAKSIS’s summer 2017 residency The Artist Entrepreneur.

The average artist’s yearly earnings from art practice is estimated at less than $10,000 US dollars. In the wake of widespread public defunding of the arts, there is mounting pressure on artists and galleries to “innovate or die”. Emerging from this crisis is the seductive but problematic image of the Artist Entrepreneur, a creative entropic force, leveraging the tools of startup culture and capital to self-disrupt and innovate new models of artistic production. Should artists embrace, subvert or actively resist this new identity? What does it risk?

To find out, a group of artists will join forces with Famous New Media artist Jeremy Bailey in a one month residency at PRAKSIS in Oslo this summer. This group of revolutionaries will collectively define new manifestos for artists working in this era of increased uncertainty. Nothing less than the future of art is at stake.”

Source: MAY – JUNE 2017 // The Artist Entrepreneur

As part of the 1 month residency program based in Oslo and offered by UKS and The Moving Museum, I will once again assist artists from all over the world to understand the foundations and underlying mechanics of the startup economy and shed some light on business model design and high-growth venture financing as well as international entrepreneurial subsidy systems.

Mentor at Lean Artist – The World’s First Seed Accelerator for Artists

During A/D/A Hamburg I joined new media artist Jeremy Bailey as a mentor for his 3 day Lean Artist seed accelerator workshop. It basically was a boot camp based on design thinking and lean startup principles to create culturally disruptive startups.

lean artist accelerator - Slides

On the first day I joined the selected group of 10 international artists with a cynical review of the worldwide startup economy to promote a more creative approach to generating relevant startup ideas. Jeremy kicked the event off with an accelerated design thinking workshop to generate needs and insights for problem statements. Over the course of 3 days the cohort created startup ideas and iterated product prototypes and pitched their artistic business ideas for additional funding on the last day.

The event also got some media attention on vice.com, so if you are interested in Jeremy’s intention behind the lean artist program, check it out.

How Will We Breathe Tomorrow? – Working with Open Government Data

As mentioned before, Jessica Broscheit is conducting a workshop about air quality and urban data at the Creative Space for Technical Innovations at Hamburg’s University of Applied Sciences. It’s called “How Will We Breathe Tomorrow” and is part of the A/D/A Hamburg 2016, a conference about future utopias for today’s urban citizen. During the workshop people can learn about government efforts to collect and share air quality data in open government data platforms and develop their own air quality monitoring device to experiment with visual, haptic and acoustic ways to explore data.


AIR MASK

Last year I worked with Jessica Broscheit und Hannes Sieg on another project within the “Next Media” master program at the University of Applied Sciences Hamburg (HAW Hamburg), called “Air Mask”. It involved research into air quality data and open government data platforms and lead to the development of a design fiction prototype of an air mask used for monitoring environmental data.

The collected data can be compared globally through a developed standardisation process and local air quality data was visualised on the mask itself in an easy to understand 3-colored alarm system. Just recently, Jessica created a website to document these projects.

Air Mask from Jessica Broscheit on Vimeo.

 

Lean Artist – The World’s First Seed Accelerator For Artists

Lean Artist
Lean Artist – The World’s First Seed Accelerator for Artists

 

Check out Lean Artist – The World’s First Seed Accelerator For Artists. The Seed Accelerator will invest 3000€ in 10 artists to create culturally disruptive startups. The Accelerator is lead by Toronto based New Media Artist Jeremy Bailey, whose work is on exhibition Tate Liverpool, Transmediale Berlin, and Balice Hertling in Paris among others.

The first cohort will start August 26-28 2016 as is part of the A/D/A Hamburg 2016, a conference about future utopias for today’s urban citizen. I was asked to join the cohort as a mentor, so I am looking forward to the event and can’t wait to see what the artists come up with.

Another great event during A/D/A Hamburg I can recommend is “How Will We Breathe Tomorrow”, a workshop with Jessica Broscheit about air and urban data at the Creative Space for Technical Innovations at Hamburg’s University of Applied Sciences.

A/D/A Hamburg
A/D/A Hamburg

The Art Of Telling No Story – Data-Driven Journalism

311 calls New York
There were 34,522 complaints called in to 311 between September 8 and September 15, 2010. Here are the most common, plotted by time of day. Illustration: Pitch Interactive

Recently I wrote about data-driven journalism and whether it is worth the effort in regards to their monetisation potential for publishing companies. Although there are definitely great and interesting stories to be told with large data sets, it seems unlikely that the immense costs involved in the process of creating these stories can be justified within the current framework of digital business models within the publishing industry.

Still many data-driven stories and corresponding data visualisations seem interesting (e.g. in form of infographics) or even insanely beautiful (e.g. in form of maps or graphs). There is one problem with some kind of data visualisations in terms of storytelling though: they tell no story.

Consider the prominent visualisations of the 311 calls in the city of New York for instance. Although immensely beautiful and acknowledged by design experts around the globe, it’s hard to find any substantial story within the data or its visualisations. As shown above a plot of 311 calls by time of day with different colors for different types of complaints surely leads to a beautiful image, but there is no real story behind it.

The facts that there are more calls during the day, complaints about street condition seem to drop during the night and noise complaints are on the rise during the evening are hardly surprising. Even if these calls are plotted on a map, an attempt also explored with the 311 data, things do not get more interesting.

Still, the visualisations of the 311 calls not only look awesome, they received high praise and are on display at the Museum of Modern Art in NYC. I am not disputing the aesthetic qualities of the visualisations, but in terms of data-driven journalism or data-driven storytelling, there is not much to be found here.


 DISCLAIMER: This post has been written for the seminar “Online and Mobile Media” during an international research exchange at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) in Sydney, Australia, within the “Next Media” master program at the University of Applied Sciences Hamburg (HAW Hamburg) in 2016. For more information or any questions please contact me at mail@moritzrecke.com.

Wynwood Walls in Miami

While in Miami during December 2015, I visited the city’s business improvement district Wynwood. It is an old industrial and warehouse district that was transformed over the past years into a colorful and vibrant neighborhood just north of downtown Miami. The walls in the area have been designed with huge graffiti paintings by artists from all over the world, making it a truly unique place to visit with lots of hipster bars and coffee shops, serving cold drip and the like.

“The Wynwood Walls was conceived by the renowned community revitalizer and placemaker, the late Tony Goldman in 2009. He was looking for something big to transform the warehouse district of Wynwood, and he arrived at a simple idea: “Wynwood’s large stock of warehouse buildings, all with no windows, would be my giant canvases to bring to them the greatest street art ever seen in one place.” Starting with the 25th–26th Street complex of six separate buildings, his goal was to create a center where people could gravitate to and explore, and to develop the area’s pedestrian potential.”

Source: The Wynwood Walls

Prelude to Spectra at Art Silicon Valley

Recently I went to Art Silicon Valley San Francisco (9-11 October 2015) at the San Mateo Event Center, an international contemporary and modern art fair. Art SV/SF is Art Miami’s fair on the West Coast between San Francisco and Silicon Valley.

art silicon valley san francisco 2015 entrance

The art sv/sf 2015 prospectus provides with a glimpse of what was on display.

“The second edition will run October 8-11, 2015 at the San Mateo Event Center and will showcase important artworks of the 20th and 21st centuries in collaboration with some of the world’s most respected galleries and art institutions.

In keeping with Art Miami’s high standards of quality, the Fair will offer a sophisticated, curated setting that showcases blue-chip Post-War and Modern works as well art by top Contemporary, Emerging and New Media artists.”

I especially enjoyed “Prelude to Spectra”, a large-scale practice performance piece, inviting visitors to engage with the facade of the San Mateo Event center by shooting paintball bullets onto the entrance of the fair. It is a project by Walter & Zoniel, who plan to perform something similar in the UK in 2016 on a face of a historical building with biodegradable paint. So I gave it a “shot” and did my part to make it a memorable piece.

Google trends confirmes stereotypes

vox:

Portland likes coffee, and other accurate food stereotypes now confirmed by Google.

Congratulations, Washington, DC, you’re the most interested in “restaurants:”

google-trends-restaurant

Coffee, unsurprisingly, reigns supreme in Portland, OR:

google-trends-coffee

Wine wins the day in San Francisco:

google-trends-wine

See what else the folks at Google Trends found using search data to determine which large cities and towns care the most about different aspects of the food world.

rAndom International – Rain Room at the Barbican, 2012


The artists of rAndom International created a pretty impressive “rain room” at London’s Barbican arts center in 2012, incorporating 3d tracking cameras and a water management system to keep any visitor dry while walking through the rain.

“Rain Room is a hundred square metre field of falling water through which it is possible to walk, trusting that a path can be navigated, without being drenched in the process.

As you progress through the space the sound of water and a suggestion of moisture fill the air, before you are confronted by this carefully choreographed downpour that responds to your movements and presence.”

Source: Rain Room, 2012 – rAndom International